New beginnings: Interpreting

Official Trailer to a 6-part webinar series for beginner interpreters and interpreters who would like to transition to remote interpreting. Links to very important study tools included!


Remote Interpreting: The Elephant in the Room (by Barry Olsen)

Remote Interpreting: Feeling Our Way into the Future Published by The ATA Chronicle New communications technologies make interpreting available where it wasn’t in the past. We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to shape the way we will work remotely, because what’s going on is game changing and shaking our profession from top to bottom. In April […]

via Remote Interpreting: The Elephant in the Room — A Word In Your Ear

What a Difference Three Decades Make!

Preamble for translators and interpreters: Maybe (just maybe) machines will not replace “all” human translators and interpreters, but all of us will be replaced by some language experts using the latest technologies. It is therefore paramount to play catchup and get on-board with actions to become technologically savvy without delay!

I recently read an 11/29/17 Washington Post Article by Marwa Eltagouiri about an 84-year-old physician who lost her license to practice medicine because she refuses to use a computer, thus failing to comply with New Hampshire State Law on medical record-keeping protocols. In reality, the case centers more around the opioid epidemic and this physician’s inability to meet the State’s electronic drug monitoring program regulations. Whatever the situation, the entire case goes to underline the “electronic” (vs. paper) component that is clearly at the heart of the issue. Regardless of what the physician believes, it is now the law to keep electronic records. That is how fast the world has moved forward in ascertaining the cyberspace as the “factual” space, as well as modern technologies as the underpinning supports for some interactions.

Although some discussions are still going on as to whether doctors have it “better” or “worse” today as a result of this technological revolution, such disagreements are do not change the fact that things “are” what they are.

Just 30 years ago –which, in historical terms, is a short period– the National Institutes of Health via NCBI still wondered if doctors had a positive or negative attitude towards computers! From those “opinion pieces,” we now see ourselves working in a world completely different from the one for which most “older” physicians were preparing 30 or 40 years ago. Everyone in the healthcare and medical fields has had to “suffer” through a very steep technology-learning curve, especially in the last two decades. In 1999 I was working at a large insurance company that employed many nurses and doctors, and I remember all of them saying they would never -ever!- use computers.

Life is not a straight line. At the end of the last century (Wow! that sounds like a long time ago!), we were implementing (*) Y2K conformity requirements, (*) the newly instituted HIPAA provisions (or equivalent efforts in other parts of the world), and (*) the novel C.L.A.S. mandate (and other cultural competency efforts around the globe). In the last 15-20 years, these monumental programs were incorporated into our routine and are now a “mainstream” aspect of our daily life.

My point, then, is that our “way of life” –our daily activities as we perceive them today– is a concept that must be re-evaluated constantly as internal and external forces change and shape it into something different than what we were “used to” just a few years ago. The rate of innovation brought about by the accelerated developments in available technologies is speeding up such rate of change. I look at my grandkids, and all of them were born after Y2K. Even for my adult children, the Cold War is a remote history lesson. Yesterday, TCM showed a movie from my youth and talked about the cinematographic importance of this “classic.” Statistically speaking, a hundred years ago I would have been dead already for a couple decades, as life expectancy for women did not even reach 40 years old!

We must at all times be aware of our surroundings, which includes perceiving, understanding, and adapting to the technological changes (extraordinary and progressive) going on around us!

Learning to Improve Our Use of LinkedIn

I met Debbie Wemyss of DW Consulting Solutions LLC via the excellent seminars offered by the Small Business Administration’s SCORE program. I attended one of her training sessions on how to harness the power of Linkedin and came out of that class with a list of ways to connect with other professional and business interests in this cyber world platform. I am working on some of her tips and tricks but quote below some of her “Favorite tips for Linkedin Success” which are just the tip of the iceberg….



  1. Back up your Connections – Get an Excel file of first/last names, title, company, email of all 1st level Connections. The default ‘Fast File’ will be ready to download in just 10 minutes! HOW: Click ‘Me’ in black navigation bar at top; choose Settings & Privacy; scroll down to ‘Get an Archive…’; click Fast File.
  2. Profile  Summary – Start it with a dynamic sentence or two to grab the Viewers’ attention! You must get them to click ‘see more’ to expand the rest of your Summary content.
  3. Include a CTA in your Summary – Viewers will not have access to your phone/email under Contact & Personal Info UNTIL they Connect with you. Include that info right in your Summary. Make it easy for interested members to reach you – don’t expect them to leave LinkedIn to search your website!
  4. Stay in front of your audience – A surefire way to do this is to post an Update on a regular basis (1x daily) that has value: Industry news, milestones, press releases, conference reviews, networking intentions, recognition accolades, etc. +TIP: Best time to post: M-F 7am-9am, 11am-1pm, 8pm-11pm (LinkedIn’s research). Include a photo or image whenever possible.
  5. Explore Groups – Especially those that are likely to appeal to your target audience. Use appropriate keywords to Search for Groups with large #’s of members. You’ll super-charge your Network. You can directly communicate up to 15x monthly with selected Group members so be selective! (+TIP: Group Members can also post available jobs – for free – using the Group / Jobs tab on Conversation boards.
  6. Personalize EVERY Invitation – Always… always…always! HOW: The onlyway to ‘Add a note’ is to click Connect ON THE MEMBER’S PROFILE. Clicking Connect anywhere else auto-sends a wordless invitation to connect…..


  1. Forget your Settings & Privacy Controls: Always be aware of how and what you are displaying to Viewers of your profile. Take a few minutes to fo through your Settings. Click Me > Settings & Privacy > Review Basic > then Review Privacy list as well.
  2. Auto-send a wordless Invitation: Always visit the Member’s profile and click Connect from there to ‘Add a note’ to personalize your Invitation. Mobile: On profile, look for 3 tiny dots in upper right & click for personalization option. Your Invitation is 5x more likely to be accepted. (LinkedIn’s research)
  3. Pitch while thanking: I see this way too often: A ‘thank you for connecting’ note that turns into a lengthy pitch. Just don’t do this! You must build a relationship, establish the know-like-trust factor, and discover their ‘pain’ before you can attempt to offer a solution.



As a micro-entrepreneur, I wear many different hats every day. From content creator to educator to business administrator to customer service agent, to tax accountant, and of course, the dreaded functions of marketing and sales. These last two are, for me, the most difficult task in the entire experience of entrepreneurship. Although I recently completed a Certificate in Small Business and Entrepreneurship (complementary to my BS in Business Management), all the theory (and even practice) learned serve little purpose to my end goals of selling my courses at a profit. I have learned through the years that you may have a “warehouse” -physical or in cyberspace- full of the most fantastic products, but if you don’t know how to take them to market, it is the same as having nothing at all. On the other hand, I have seen individuals with very doubtful products become millionaires because they simply were genius at marketing their product or idea. It is a skill like any other but, just as you can learn some skills, it is also true that you can “not” learn other skills. If you lack balance, you will not be able to ride a bike.

I have reached the point where I must admit my Marketing & Sales “gene” is yet to be found! That is why my learning experience with Debbie about all the fantastic opportunities rendered by Linkedin will come in so handy in 2018 and beyond. Until now, I have used this medium more as a sort of professional Facebook account than as a marketing tool. I learned so many tips and tricks, that my readers hopefully will be seeing some changes in the coming months. I learned that I could not do certain things in Linkedin: for example, to comply with Linkedin’s User Agreement Regulations (I admit I had not read them), I had to close an account I was using to promote my business! Instead of it, I had to open an “appropriate” company account in Linkedin for BRAUERTRAINING under my “personal” profile (I did not know that!). I am now merging, updating and upgrading the “combined” pages. I will also be adding at least three new contacts every day and will be giving and asking for recommendations. I will be more proactive in my networks and groups…. ufff… sounds like a lot of work… and it is… but at least I believe it is grounded in solid recommendations.

Finally, if you let me know what subjects you would like me to address in 2018, I will start researching those topics and hopefully providing insights in the matters that are important to us as language experts or language-experts-to-be! Also, let me know where I can improve…. I am always receptive to comments and suggestions. Feel free to send me a note via Linkedin or email me at Thank you for your continued support!

PS: Also, make sure to check upcoming training sessions using the platform, visiting


I am not the expert on Linkedin, so I will refer you to some of Debbie’s articles that will provide some fantastic tips…. and make sure to follow her and take some of her training sessions. They are worth your time!

Debbies short video

Half a Billion Members

Audience and Posts